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Candace Fujikane

English Professor

Author

New Release

Mapping Abundance for a Planetary Future: Kanaka Maoli and Critical Settler Cartographies in Hawaiʻi (Duke University Press, 2021)
 

In Mapping Abundance for a Planeatery Future, Candace Fujikane contends that the practice of mapping abundance is a radical act in the face of settler capital's fear of an abundance that feeds. Cartographies of capital enable the seizure of abundant lands by enclosing "wastelands" claimed to be underdeveloped. By contrast, Kanaka Maoli cartographies map the continuities of abundant worlds. Vital to restoration movements is the art of kilo, intergenerational observation of elemental forms encoded in storied histories, chants, and songs. The laws of these elements are now being violated by toxic waste dumping, leaking military jet fuel tanks, and astronomical-industrial complexes. As Kānaka Maoli and their allies stand as land and water protectors, Fujikane calls for a profound attunement to the elemental forms in order to transform climate events into renewed possibilities for abundance. 

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"Mapping Abundance for a Planetary Future slays settler colonial cartographies that diminish life. The book breathes with the voices of Hawaiian conmmunities, lands, movements, elements, and Candace Fujikane herself, at her best. Saturated in the abundance of Kanaka Maoli mappings and moʻolelo, this book is a spear and a spade, medicine and masterpiece, a diagnosis and a portal, a lei and a hoʻokupu." 

—Noelani Goodyear-Kaʻōpua, 

author of The Seeds We Planted: Portraits of a Native Hawaiian Charter School

Reviews

"With intellectual verve, analytical agility, and ethnographic gracefulness, Candace Fujikane unpacks the perversity of settler capitalism, which produces scarcity in order to claim its toxic surplus, as she amplifies Kanaka Maoli support of an earth cartography of abundant healing and protection. A groundbreaking work; a must read." 

—Elizabeth A. Povinelli,

author of The Inheritance

"To read this bo0k is to be invited into a world of abundance, a world where the practices of ea, of "life, breath, political sovereignty and the rising of the people" can teach love of land, seas, and skies, and cultivate resurgence. . . .There is a deliberate and careful specificity to the abundance that Fujikane maps, with each chapter discussing a particular social movement struggle or set of resurgent practices to conserve, protect and enhance abundance, interwoven with critical discussion and analysis. Through each chapter, then, is interwoven a dual movement—of peeling back some of the toxic processes and imaginaries associated with settler-colonial, capitalist cartographies of occupation, and of supporting some of the many multitemporal, diverse, dynamic, multiscalar abundances of Kanaka Maoli cartographies. . . .Readers are swept "i ka wiliwai a ka makemake" (whirlpool of desire), not for the possessive relations of capitalism, but for a remembering of the moʻo guardians and the places relationally described in the moʻolelo; a whirlpool of desire for wonder, for caring relations, and for the continuities of land, seas, and skies." 

—Sarah Wright, review in The Association of American Geographers (AARG) Review of Books

Upcoming Events

November 7, 2021:

Mapping Abundance. Greenhouse Environmental Humanities Book Talk Series, University of Stavanger, Norway.

Zoom, online. 

October 25, 2021: Hawaiʻi Book and Music Festival

Panel with Candace Fujikane, Puni Jackson, Program Director of Hoʻoulu ʻĀina, and Hiʻilei Kawelo, Executive Director of Paepae o Heʻeia

October 21, 2020: “Elemental Cartography: Kanaka Maoli Restorative Mapping for a Changing Earth.” Barry Ruderman Conference on Cartography: Indigenous Mapping. David Rumsey Map Center at Stanford Libraries. Zoom online, October 21, 2021.

Upcoming Events

November 10, 2021: “Cartographies of Kanaloa: Inundation and Restoration.” Institute for Contemporary Art, Miami, Florida.

Zoom, online. 

October 25, 2021: Hawaiʻi Book and Music Festival

Panel with Candace Fujikane, Puni Jackson, Program Director of Hoʻoulu ʻĀina, and Hiʻilei Kawelo, Executive Director of Paepae o Heʻeia

October 21, 2020: “Elemental Cartography: Kanaka Maoli Restorative Mapping for a Changing Earth.” Barry Ruderman Conference on Cartography: Indigenous Mapping. David Rumsey Map Center at Stanford Libraries. Zoom online, October 21, 2021.

Appearances
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About Candace Fujikane

Candace Fujikane was born in Honolulu and grew up in Pukalani, Maui on the slopes of Haleakalā.

She has stood for lands and waters in Hawaiʻi for the past 20 years. 

She is an English professor at the University of Hawaiʻi, and she teaches classes on the stand that aloha ʻāina are taking to protect lands, waters, and skies in Hawaiʻi.

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